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Spring 2013
Apr 16,2014
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

ANTH 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ANTHROPOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar?s Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Anthropology Department

ANTH 102 - INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY
Anthropology is the study of human diversity. It emphasizes the role of culture in shaping human adaptations and actions. This course will introduce students to the methods, theories and basic concepts of the field. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to question their assumptions about human lives. The course will also address the question of how anthropology can help us comprehend contemporary world problems.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Anthropology Department

ANTH 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ANTHROPOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Anthropology Department

ANTH 220 - FOOD AND CULTURE
Food influences the life of every person: from one's personal relationship with food to religious dietary rules to global corporate food production. This course addresses the meanings of food among different cultures, and it explores the ways in which geographic, cultural, political, and economic forces interact to influence our food preferences, health, and nutritional status. How do gender, ethnicity, class, religion, the media, and corporate capitalism influence the manner in which we perceive, acquire, prepare, and consume food? Moreover, how do we, through what and how we eat and do not eat, construct relationships with our bodies, with others, with our histories, with animals, and the environment? We will examine these questions through the use of academic texts, media accounts, personal narratives, art, film, and fieldwork. Students should be willing to participate in class discussion and activities, as well as organized and independent fieldtrips. IMPORTANT: This course requires students to participate in fieldtrips in the New York Metropolitan area. There will be commuting and other costs involved (such as museum fees, food during the trips, etc.) . If you feel that your schedule is not flexible enough or that your budget is too limited, you should not take this course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, WRITING INTENSIVE

ANTH 223 - WORLD CULTURES
This course will introduce students to groups of people living in many different areas of the world. We will focus on indigenous peoples and cultural change, a vibrant area of anthropological research and an issue that affects peoples in countries throughout the world. Our main case study examines the predicament of indigenous peoples as they deal with the state and with more powerful peoples in three different regions of the world. Some of the central questions we will address are: Who are indigenous peoples? What are the forms of social organization and cultural practices of particular groups of indigenous peoples? How have indigenous peoples sought to maintain sovereignty and their unique identities in the face of continued discrimination and marginalization? What international efforts have been made to develop policies and programs that improve the situation of indigenous peoples? We will also critically examine representations of indigenous peoples in the popular media.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, WRITING INTENSIVE

ANTH 225 - INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
The course will review recent trends in international migration in the context of the processes of globalization. We will study contemporary movements of people crossing international borders, and will look at the social and cultural effects of these movements. The course will familiarize students with shifts in migration over time and the political and economic processes that shape international migration. By examining several in-depth ethnographic studies, we will also learn about individuals and communities experience various forms of migration. Some of the key questions the course addresses are: Why do peoples relocate across international borders? Why and how do states attempt to control international migration and what are the effects of these policies on migrants' lives? How is the meaning of citizenship changing in an era of globalization? How are the identities of migrants shaped by the experience of migration? What kinds of relationships do migrants maintain with homelands and with communities of migrants in other countries?
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 235 - RELIGION: CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
This course will introduce students to the concept of religion as a phenomenon that exists cross culturally. The course will survey the major anthropological theories in the study of religion, and students will be asked to apply these theories by conducting a short ethnographic research project on a local religious practice. Students will learn about a wide range of religious practices, including those associated with major world religions as well as shamanism, magic, and witchcraft. The course will also focus on the political dimensions of religion in the contemporary world, including an examination of progressive and fundamentalist movements.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 238 - URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY
Cities are not only windows into the cultural, social, and economic issues of a society; they are juxtapose people of all walks of life. Using New York as a case study, this course will present an anthropological perspective on life in cities. It will also provide students the necessary tools to think critically about the meaning of "urban life" and how this meaning is mapped out onto social space. Drawing on social histories, ethnographies, social theory, short stories, and films, we will question the social and cultural categories that exist within the urban environment. Specific issues will include, but will not be limited to, the spatial component of race and ethnicity; socioeconomic class, gender, and time; the marginalization and social invisibility of certain groups of people; and aesthetics and arts. Moreover, students will be required to undertake fieldwork in the city and participate in fieldtrips during the semester to apply the theoretical concepts of the course. As a result, students will reconcile the stereotypical images of the city with the realities of millions of urban lives that live in the New York metropolitan area. The course will conclude with comparison with other urban areas to contextualize the specific case study covered in the course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Race & Ethnicity, MJ-AMER-Multicultural Studies, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ANTHROPOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Anthropology Department

ANTH 307 - MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
We will investigate how the definition, diagnosis, experience, and treatment of illnesses vary across cultures. In particular, readings and discussions will examine the social construction of health and illness, exploring the diverse ways in which humans use cultural resources to cope with disease and to develop medical and healing systems. The primary goal of this course is to help students to challenge beliefs about some often taken-for-granted assumptions about health and human behavior using the tools provided by anthropological theories and concepts. Premedical students are especially encouraged to enroll.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA, TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

ANTH 308 - ANTHROPOLOGY OF GENDER
This course focuses on the construction of gender in cross-cultural perspective. We will examine the meanings of masculinity and femininity in different societies and how women's and men's lives are shaped by constructions of gender. We begin the semester by exploring how societies create gender differences through body modification practices, and raise questions about the relationship between the categories of gender and sex. Next we survey cross-cultural differences in the organization of kinship, reproduction and labor and study how these differences affect the construction of gender cross-culturally. We conclude the course by considering the concept of gender equity and the efforts of the international women's movement to create gender equity.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 310 - POLITICS, CULTURE & IDENTITY
This course will focus on the intersection of identity, politics, and culture from a qualitative perspective. Identity is a widely used term in academia that is rarely scrutinized. Its use ranges from far-reaching national identity and citizenship to personal issues of gender and belonging. Drawing from both historical and contemporary issues, students will examine the role of politics in the formation of identity and the influence different forms of identity play in the policy-making process. The course will draw on contemporary cases from Europe and the Americas. While the course will rely primarily from anthropological sources and theory, it will also utilize a multi-disciplinary framework to attempt to address the complex relationsip between culture, politics, and identity. Specific issues that will be addressed include symbols, ritual, memory, nationalism, race, ethnicity, food, space, gender, poverty, democracy, resistance, migration, and citizenship. The format of the course will be both lecture and discussion. Students should be ready to participate at every meeting.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 312 - ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK
This course is an introduction to ethnographic fieldwork, the main method of research in cultural anthropology. Fieldwork is fundamentally a hands-on activity, and thus constitutes a form of experiential learning. We will read about fieldwork, but we'll also learn about fieldwork by doing it. The course consists of a series of short field research assignments, and a short field research project that you present at the end of this course. This course is an elective for all Anthropology minors.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Fieldwork

Anthropology Department

ANTH 314 - CROSSING BORDERS
"Borders," wrote Primo Levi "are where wars start." But borders are also sites of cultural exchange, where bridges across cultural differences may be built. Children of Latino/a immigrants who have crossed national borders face cultural borders that they are forced to traverse everyday. This course explores the social and cultural forces shaping how Latino/a youth define themselves within an increasingly multi-cultural society. What's it like to grow up Latino/a in the United States around the turn of the millennium, a time when Latinos/as are the nation's largest and fastest growing minority? What are the consequences of speaking two languages and living between two cultures? How have US concepts of race influenced the formation of Latino/a identities? What does it mean to be Latino/a, anyway? These questions will be addressed in a seminar setting with active student participation.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Race & Ethnicity

ANTH 320 - NATIONALISM AND ETHNICITY
In this course, we will review key theories concerning the concepts of nationalism and ethnicity and examine how nationalism and ethnicity affect people's lives in places throughout the world. While these concepts have been studied by scholars in many disciplines, this course will focus on ethnographic approaches that emphasize how people in particular locations come to see themselves as belonging to nations and ethnic groups. Some of the central questions that we will address in this course are: How are culture, power and history involved in the construction of nations and ethnic groups? What is the relationship between nationalism, ethnicity and the state? How do nationalism and ethnicity relate to gender, race, and religious identity? How has globalization changed national and ethnic identities and nationalist and ethnic politics?
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

ANTH 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ANTHROPOLOGY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Anthropology Department

ANTH 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department

ANTH 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Anthropology Department


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