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Spring 2012
Apr 21,2014
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

ECON 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Economics Department

ECON 101 - MICROECONOMICS
Microeconomics studies the motivations, incentives and constraints on individuals in their market decision-making, and the effect these decisions have on society. As a result of the decisions by consumers and producers, prices are determined and goods and services are accordingly allocated. The students are provided with an analytical perspective to think critically about market systems and the social objectives it may serve. The major emphasis of the class is to understand the supply-and-demand paradigm, but topics such as utility theory, market structure and government intervention into the market are covered. The goals of the class include learning specific terms and economic models, understanding the way in which economists approach problems, recognizing issues of economic importance and analyzing the effect government policies have on individuals.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 102 - INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS
In macroeconomics the focus is on the whole economic environment. This directly affects how corporations, unions, governments, and community and social service agencies function. It also determines the general condition of the job markets and employment. Course goals include helping you: (1) explore the structure of key institutions of modern, especially U.S. capitalism, including private property, the market system, government, households, corporations, money and the financial system; (2) explore economic processes including the functioning of supply and demand, market power, market failures, government as a resource, international economic relations, and class relations; (3) develop analytical skills; (4) develop a theoretical understanding of the overall economy using an elementary macroeconomic model; (5) apply theoretical knowledge to practical policy issues, both historical and contemporary, with an emphasis on fiscal and monetary policies; and (6) think critically about economic knowledge through understanding both classical/monetary and Keynesian economics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Economics Department

ECON 201 - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS
With this study of how individual agents, both firms and households, interact in market situations to determine the price of goods and services, students gain a better understanding of how scarce resources are allocated. Intermediate Microeconomics is a more theoretical treatment of some of the topics covered in Microeconomics. The class will be concerned with learning tools of economic analysis, which are applicable to economic situations such as: consumer sovereignty, the labor/leisure tradeoff, the economics of information and monopsony power in baseball. The goals of the class include: learning the intermediate tools and terminology that economists use, developing a theoretical approach for analyzing consumer preferences, showing how altruism can be explained using utility theory, exploring the relationship between inputs and outputs and understanding how economic theory can explain everyday economic behavior.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 202 - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS
Macroeconomics is a study of the whole or overall economy, focusing on inflation, unemployment, global trade, and periods of expansion followed by contractions of domestic output. It also includes a study of interest rates, trade deficits, budget deficits, and the production of economic knowledge itself. You will learn various economic theories that facilitate an understanding and interpretation of these matters. You will also be expected to apply theoretical knowledge to practical policy issues, both historical and contemporary, and to forecast the impact of economic policy and structural changes on the economy.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 253 - AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY
The subject matter of American Economic History is the growth and development of the economy. We will analyze how factors of production were brought together with unique institutions to create goods and services which raised the standard of living. The rubric for the class is to apply the theoretical tools of economic analysis to historical events. Three time periods will be analyzed: the Colonial and Early National Period, the Ante-bellum period, and the Post-bellum period up to 1914. The topics covered include: the regional specialization of the colonies, the impact of the antebellum transportation system, the consequences of slavery, and the emergence of the United States as an economic power. The goals of the class: to re-examine American history using an economic paradigm to become more adept at economic analysis by using theory with historical evidence, to identify the factors that influenced the pace of long-run economic growth and to interpret historical data and evidence.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-AMER- Amer History

ECON 254 - FUNDAMENTALS OF POLITICAL ECONOMICS
Political economy focuses on how a capitalist society works emphasizing class and power. We will study the underlying foundation of modern (principally U.S.) capitalism. Conventional economic thinking stresses market relationships, harmony of interests between buyers and sellers, and the attainment of a stable equilibrium. By contrast, central to political economy is understanding social and economic change. The dynamic forces are power relationships, contradictory tensions--especially between employers and employees--and the resolution of conflict. Course goals are to help you: (1) explore approaches to economic thinking that is out of the mainstream. More particularly, to explore a modern loosely defined heterodox school called "Political Economy" inspired by three principal intellectual traditions: Thorstein Veblen, Karl Marx, and Post-Keynesianism; (2) develop your skills to read and interpret an article and defend your views in class discussion; (3) enhance your computer and on-line skills through a class treated discussion group (WebCT); and (4) enhance your capacity for critical thinking about the status-quo that is captured by Veblen's insight "whatever is, is wrong".
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Economics Department

ECON 302 - MONEY AND ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
A study of money, credit, and banking in the American economy. Topics will include the nature and functions of money and the operations of the American banking and Federal Reserve systems. Special emphasis will be given to the tools and transmission of monetary policies, and the relationships between money, prices, and employment.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 303 - ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
An explanation of why contemporary economics theory is ill-equipped to solve current environmental problems. Marginal concepts will be explained and critiqued. In addition, the course suggests a more holistic approach that recognizes that the economy is merely part of a larger social structure and that maximization of economic goals may often subvert larger social system goals.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 304 - POLITICAL ECONOMY OF GLOBAL CAPITALISM
An historical and theoretical investigation of the laws of motion global capitalism. This is an interdisciplinary course that draws on ideas and explanations from many fields of study -- economics, economic geography, political science, sociology, history -- and on examples from all parts of the world. It studies the interrelation between trade, investment, and production in a complex real world framework that encompasses a variety of economic and non-economic forces.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-Amer-Amer in the World, MJ-AMER-America in the World, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

ECON 305 - INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION
Industrial Organization is a policy course concerned with the way in which markets are structured, and the influence of government regulation. Theoretical approaches and empirical evidence will be considered. The three broad subject areas covered will be: theories and paradigms explaining how markets operate, case studies of how specific industries operate, and the role of government regulation on the behavior of industries. Students study how firms strategically react to rivals, customers and the government. The course will also cover the development of Anti-trust and social regulation, and the effect these have had on American business. The goals of the class include: to learn the terms and models economists use to identify, understand and predict market behavior; to learn specific facts about various industries; to understand where market power comes from; and to investigate and compile information on an industry and to present this material in a lively and interesting manner.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 310 - ECONOMETRICS
Econometrics is the application of mathematical and statistical methods and techniques in order to: 1) help understand, analyze, and interpret economic and financial data, 2) test economic and financial hypotheses/theories, and 3) generate predictions about particular economic and financial variables. Econometrics is fundamentally a regression-based correlation methodology used to measure the overall strength, direction, and statistical significance between a "dependent" variable - the variable whose movement or change is to be explained - and one or more "independent" variables that will explain the movement or change in the dependent variable. Students are expected to have a solid grounding in algebra and Management Statistics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 322 - LABOR ECONOMICS
After reviewing classical economists' and philosophers' attitudes toward labor, we will move to modern corporate-dominated concepts and practices, noting alternative ways to view human and social capital. Wage theory including supply and demand, history and roles of unions, patterns of contingent and immigrant workers, issues of work-life balance and "job vs. career" will be covered. Areas of individual income, labor market participation, poverty, discrimination and inequality of income are next. Public policies helping create the context for employers and workers to interact will be reviewed and critiqued: minimum wage, unemployment insurance, anti-discrimination laws, low wage work supports, health and safety regulations, and training resources. Methods of instruction: speakers from employers, unions and governments; case study on employer staffing strategies; public policy debate on outsourcing and off-shoring of work; analysis of data on worker vs. CEO and male vs. female compensation.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 323 - COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS
This course is a survey of different economic systems across the globe, from developing nations to G8 economics. Initially we will explore theoretical issues of comparative systems and economic development, before transitioning to investigating and analyzing the economic systems of certain countries.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
SB-INTERNATIONAL CATEGORY, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

ECON 325 - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
International Economics is concerned with explaining the motivations and actions of economic agents as they made decisions about scarce resources, and the effect these actions have on the global and domestic economy. This class will provide the context through which international economic events can be interpreted. In thinking about the class there will be three areas of discovery: theory, policy and data. We will be studying neoclassical theories, which explain the casual factors that determine the size and composition of international transactions, we will be examining policies, which influence these transactions and finally we will be looking at empirical information, which will help us critically evaluate the theories and policies. This is a writing intensive class so you will have a substantial research assignment, which reinforces the information covered in class.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
SB-INTERNATIONAL CATEGORY, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, WRITING INTENSIVE

ECON 330 - ECONOMICS OF THE SPORTS INDUSTRY
The course analyzes the economic behaviors and decisions made by economic agents in the field of athletics, whether it is professional or amateur. Topics covered inluce labor markets of professional leagues, the pricing of sports events, player and team movements, revenue sharing mechanisms, salary cap management, the NCAA, and the wage effects of athletic participation in NCAA or NAIA sports. This is a reading and discussion intensive class.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 331 - ECONOMICS AND THE LAW
The application of economic analysis to enhance understanding of the present legal system. Concepts of economic efficiency and equity, risk bearing, and competition are applied to areas including nuisance law, breach of contract, law enforcement, pollution controls and product liability. Satisfies Law & Society comparative requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 332 - HEALTH ECONOMICS:AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
In this course, students will learn the application of the basic economic tools and reasoning to health care systems and the production of health in an economic system. Since this course is designed for general business students and nursing students, we will focus initially on learning the basic tools of health economics. We will then focus on the markets for health care and focus individual attention on the various economic agents involved in the production of health care. Finally, we will compare the US system of health care to other benchmark systems across the world. At the end of the course, students will have anlayzed the institutions and market conditions of a foreign health care system of their choosing. This course will take place during the extended summer session and will have two required meetings. Otherwise, the course will be online using Ramapo's Moodle System.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

ECON 343 - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT
A study of the contributions by major economists to our understanding of society. The course will bring into focus the interplay of events, theory, and policy from one period to the next; as well as the applicability of these ideas to contemporary problems
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

ECON 360 - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
An analysis of economic development as a goal of almost all societies. This course will discuss the principal theories of economic development and analyze a cross-section of particular problems of economic development -- population pressure, low agricultural productivity, industrialization, and unfair income distribution. Case studies of particular developing economies will be expected from students.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: ECONOMICS
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Economics Department

ECON 401 - INTERNSHIP IN ECONOMICS
The transition from college to a career path is often difficult. The internship is an opportunity both to apply economic concepts to real world problems and to gain practical work place experience. Participants are placed at off-campus sites, which include unions, community service organizations, legislative offices, government agencies and others. Enrollment is limited to Seniors with significant course work in economics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department

ECON 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Economics Department


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