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Spring 2011
Apr 20,2014
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POLI 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the Instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 107 - INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE
An introduction to the basic concepts, terminology, and problems of contemporary political science. This course will emphasize the systematic investigation of the functions and structures of political systems and will include readings from a variety of political ideologies in the modern world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Political Science Department

POLI 130 - THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE COMMUNITY
This course will explore the nature of the bonds and responsibilities that exist between and among individuals in a democratic society. This exploration will be both empirical and normative. This course will also include a service learning component that will allow students individual as well as group placements in non-profit organizations and various community based organizations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study, Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 205 - MODERN COMPARATIVE POLITICS
An analysis of selected major political systems in the world today. The institutions and domestic politics of England, France, the Russia, China, Mexico, Tanzania, and other countries will be studied. The selections are intended to provide a glimpse into the politics of advanced industrial, communist, and Third World countries.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

POLI 206 - POLITICAL THEORY
An examination of the traditional concerns expressed by political theorists from the Greeks to the Enlightenment. The course will analyze the changes in notions regarding political authority and legitimacy and the function of the state as they have developed through history. The theories of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau will constitute the bulk of the subject matter of the course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

POLI 209 - COMMUNISM AND POST COMMUNISM
This course offers a basic comparison of communist systems from three aspects: first, the historical factors that gave rise to communist movements; second, similarities and differences in terms of models and strategies to pursue communist goals; and, third, reform and retreat of communism. Three countries will be used as cases for comparison: the former Soviet Union, China, and the former Yugoslavia. East European countries will be selectively used to examine the recent systemic transformation of communism.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

POLI 211 - RUSSIAN POLITICAL HISTORY
A history of Russia from 1861 through the Soviet period. The course will examine in historical and political perspective the reforms of Alexander II, the Russian revolutionary movement of the 19th century, the age of Nicholas and Alexandra, Lenin and the rise of Bolshevism, Stalin's dictatorship, Khrushchev's reforms, Brezhnev's consolidation of Soviet society, the Andropov-Chernenko interregnum, Gorbachev's perestroika, and post-communist Russia.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe, MJ-INTL-Intl Comparative 'West

POLI 221 - CHINESE ECONOMY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
This course is designed for students of economics/international business who would like to understand China and students of China who would like to understand the Chinese economy from a global perspective. In addition to a general profile of the Chinese economy, the course will focus on the role of China as an important market for foreign trade and investment and as an economic giant for the 21st century. It deals with the following issues: the economic environment of China; China's economic performance and ranking in the world; market liberalisation and the reform of state-owned enterprises; the emergence of town and village enterprises; China's trade and external economic relations; recent trends and outlook in investment; accession to the World Trade Organization and its impact on different sectors; China's business relations with the Pacific Rim nations; foreign market entry modes; exporting and importing; licensing and franchising; wholly owned subsidiaries and joint ventures; managing foreign business, contract negotiations and approval; transaction costs; and culture and business networks. At the completion of the course, students will have a good understanding of how the Chinese economy runs and how to do business with China.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Asia, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

POLI 223 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT
A comprehensive examination of American government. Political culture, constitutional evolution, federalism, public opinion, interest groups, parties, and the congressional, Presidential, and bureaucratic processes will be studied. The course will emphasize major problems confronting American society and will enable students to proceed from general to specific inquiry in the study of American government.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

POLI 225 - AMERICAN DIPLOMACY
As the 21st century unfolds the United States is the world's most powerful state. This course studies the growth of that power from the American Revolution to the early 20th century by examining the variables influencing the formulation of foreign policy. We will seek to comprehend the basic issues, principles, objectives, means, and outcomes of American foreign policy. Attention will be directed to: the constraints and opportunities emanating from the external environment; the principled ends of American foreign policy; the role of ideology (the interplay of principle, mythologizing, and conceptions of self interest), and, of course, domestic politics.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 227 - POLITICS OF DEVELOPING NATIONS
A study of the problems, processes, and prospects for development in Third World countries. Types of regimes and leadership, political parties, and differing patterns of political behavior will be emphasized.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

POLI 233 - EAST ASIA: HISTORY AND POLITICS
An examination of the historical evolution of China, Japan, and Korea. The course will analyze the contemporary societies and politics of these countries and their relationship with the United States.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Asia, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

POLI 235 - INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
An introduction to international politics. The course will cover the nature of the international system in general, focusing on a range of specific contemporary issues. U.S./Russia relations, the role of China, the Middle East, and "North/South" issues are among the subjects to be studied.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

POLI 236 - POLITICS OF GLOBALIZATION
A study of the major forces shaping the global marketplace. Topics include the major participants, interest groups, multinational corporations, and governments, domestic and international. Current issues impacting trade, the economy, and environmental impacts will include a focus on public policies, their processes and the substance of issues. Case studies will include the debate over free trade, the impact on national sovereignty, culture, and the policies of the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the United Nations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Europe

POLI 253 - ASIA-PACIFIC POLITCAL SYTEMS
A survey of the political systems of the Asian Pacific countries including Southeast Asia, the Pacific island countries, and Australia-New Zealand. This course will examine the political institutions and the political processes of the Pacific countries, analyze the major policy agendas confronting them, and assess the emerging patterns of a Pacific community. United States' involvement in the area will be a concurrent theme.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Asia, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West

POLI 257 - ETHNIC POLITICS IN AMERICA
This course will deal with the question of the role of ethnic groups in American politics. There will be an assessment of the various theories that attempt to describe the role of the ethnic in American society and the impact of ethnic groups on American politics. The latter part of the course will deal with specific ethnic groups such as Jews, Irish-Catholics, Italians and Blacks, and their particular input into the American system.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics, MJ-AMER-Multicultural Studies

POLI 290 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study, Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 301 - CHINA: HISTORY, POLITICS, AND CULTURE
This course is designed as an introduction to China emphasizing the major themes and issues in its historical, political, and cultural development. Particular emphasis will be placed on China's experiences with modernization and reform in the 20th century along with its interactions with the West.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

POLI 302 - EUROPEAN POLITICS
A study of the governmental institutions, practices, and current politics of major European political systems. Countries to be studied include England, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, and the European union, with emphasis on their modes of operation, their political cultures and political parties, their leaders, and the issues that confront them.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 304 - POLITICAL MOVEMENTS AND INTEREST GROUPS
Conflict is a normal part of social life. People share feelings and interests. They want to change a situation, or conserve it. The emergence of shared identities and interests generates a sense of community. Activists and leaders emerge. They try to build a movement. Goals are sought by engaging in politics, i.e., interest groups are organized to represent the community/movement. This class examines these processes using case studies of actual movements, successful or not.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

POLI 305 - JAPAN: HISTORY, POLITICS, AND CULTURE
An in-depth examination of Japan's historical legacy, its evolving political system, and its cultural foundations. This course will look at Japan, past and present, from the perspectives of history, politics, and culture. It is especially recommended for Political Science, History, and Social Science majors.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Area Studies-Asia

POLI 306 - RUSSIAN SOCIETY AND POLITICS
An examination of Russia today. Areas covered include its political system: political parties, government, and personalities. Contemporary society is also included: workers, farmers, intellectuals, women, youth, consumers, nationalities, and others. What is life like in a post-communist society? Future trends?
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

POLI 308 - CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN POLITICS
This course is organized around current controversies in American society such as those involving affirmative action, taxation, welfare to workfare, and abortion. Through an analysis of these issues, students will become familiar with some of the major texts and ideas in contemporary political theory, as well as develop the concepts necessary to participate intelligently in current debates.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

POLI 309 - CIVIL RIGHTS
An examination of the civil rights movement as well as other related historical and contemporary documents and events influencing the continued struggle for justice by African Americans. Issues such as busing, affirmative action, selected Supreme Court decisions, legislative enactments, economic inequality, and electoral and protest politics will be reviewed.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MN-AFR AMR STD-Hist & Pol Tht, MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, GE-INTERCULT NORTH AMERICA

POLI 310 - THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS
This course deals with the United States Congress. This class will examine the institutional development of Congress, elections, the legislative process and how Congress interacts with other political institutions and actors including the president, the judiciary, political parties, interest groups and the public.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

POLI 312 - UNITED NATIONS: WORLD POLITICS
This course will explore the nature and role of the United Nations as it affects and is affected by world politics. Issues to be covered will include conflict resolution, economic development, peacekeeping, and human rights. Special features of this course will include classroom simulations of UN organizations and possible participation at the National Model UN organizations and possible participation at the National Model UN Conference in New York. There will be a final exam, a country position paper and a research project (20 pages). Participation will be a major part of the grade.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-America in the World, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

POLI 315 - AMERICA'S VIETNAM EXPERIENCE
An analysis of the historical roots of U.S. involvement in post-World War II Vietnam. The source of strength and weakness manifested by our American foes and friends in the region and, most importantly, the dynamics of U.S. policy and performance in both their military and political dimensions will be studied.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-America in the World, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

POLI 316 - POLITICAL SCIENCE METHODOLOGY
The emphasis of the course is on the development of four basic skills that will help students think critically and creatively: (1) conceiving and developing questions and hypotheses for research purpose; (2) collecting data to aid research; (3) analyzing data, including the use of traditional research methods, statistics, and computer; and (4) writing clearly, forcefully, and logically about social science. Class will be in a lecture-discussion format including some laboratory work in the College's computer lab.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE

POLI 317 - AMERICAN PARTY POLITICS
Examination of the major characteristics of American political parties and interest groups. Particular emphasis will be placed on American electoral behavior and on determining the effectiveness of various party functions including socialization, structuring, and moderation of conflict; recruitment of political leadership; and the running of government.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 318 - POLITICS OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT
An examination of the structures and processes of state and local government. Particular attention will be paid to the shaping of public policy in New Jersey and the roles played by the different branches of government in such issues as housing, taxation, and business-related matters. Guest speakers.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 319 - U.N. SEMINAR
This seminar will provide Ramapo students with a unique opportunity to study the United Nations and contemporary issues in world affairs through a series of high-level briefings, workshops, and simulations and seminar sessions in New York and at the United Nations. Diplomats, UN officials, and representatives of non-governmental organizations will be guest speakers on topics including human rights, war and peace issues, economic development and the global environment. Ramapo students will also get an opportunity to interact with university students from across the United States and around the world who will also participate in this seminar. Daily sessions in New York. Because of the unique nature of this program, an additional fee of approximately $400 will be charged.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 320 - TERRORISM IN THE MODERN WORLD
This course is designed as an upper level seminar to explore the critical complex and timely topic of contemporary terrorism. The theoretical and conceptual aspects of terrorism as well as its historical context and evolution will be examined as well as the focus on its current manifestations. Issues on terrorism's causes, solutions, security and civil rights implications will also be considered. Students will be expected to participate fully in class discussions, lead class discussions on assigned readings, and complete a research paper in some aspect of the topic.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

POLI 321 - THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT
The purposes of this course are to acquaint students with the breadth of scholarship concerning the United States Supreme Court and produce original research. The topics and readings reflect the interdisciplinary nature of public law and studying the Court including work in political science, legal studies (e.g. law professors), and history. The authors are generally considered experts in the field and employ various research methods. The course is organized into four sections--evolution of the Court including its powers and place within the broader political context, staffing the Court and case selection, judicial decision-making, and the impact of Court cases. Throughout the course, we will discuss the basic contours of the literature, the implications of the research, and the research methods used by the authors. We will also apply the course material to the current Court and its cases.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

POLI 322 - VOTING AND PUBLIC OPINION
This course studies psephology: how political actors within the electorate behave within democratic contexts and elections, focusing upon public opinion, political attitudes, political participation, and voting behavior, as well as related topics including socialization, political psychology, and analyzing polling data. If democracy is rule by the masses, this course studies the political nature of these people and their implications.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 323 - CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS
This advanced course is for undergraduates studying electoral forces, candidate behavior, campaign dynamics, presidential and congressional elections, campaign finance, and the media. The focus of the course centers on American elections, specifically presidential, state-wide, and congressional elections, but other electoral systems receive comparative treatment. This course looks at aggregate-level phenomena in elections (in contrast to the Political Behavior course which examines individual-level phenomena).
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 327 - POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course focuses on the construction of political reality through the deeper underlying psychological processes as they are applied to politics. Special attention is given to the constructing of reality through the news media (including the "manufacture of consent"), the creation and use of political enemies, the changing contemporary influence of religion on politics, leadership and the U.S. election process. Political psychology also focuses on questions of values and morality, human needs, and the political/psychological "facts" that stand in the center of our view of reality. This course includes mainly U.S. and Asian sources.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, SS-Sch Core-Consc & Society

POLI 328 - LAW AND POLITICS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
This course is designed for students in political science, environmental studies, international studies, business, and law and society among others who are interested in current international environmental issues and problems. These issues and problems, (i.e., global warming, sustainable development, resource depletion, biodiversity of the sea, etc.) will be analyzed in the context of existing international law and political conditions including the role of governments and non-governmental organizations, international organizations and multi-national corporations. This course may serve as an elective for political science, international studies and environmental studies.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, TS-Sch Core- SCP Category

POLI 340 - AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
A study of the evolution, powers, and limitations of the Presidency. Emphasis will be placed on the Presidential selection process and varying Presidential management styles. The course will include an analysis of the President's roles as Commander-in-Chief, foreign policy maker, "chief legislator," chief executive, and party leader.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 349 - AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
This class will study the substantive problems that comprise the foreign policy of the United States and the process by which that policy is formulated and implemented. The evolution of the U.S. to a position of global power will provide the framework within which to understand the relationship(s) between: domestic and international politics (the actors and elements comprising the decision process); idealism and "realpolitik"; and to identify emerging issues that along with traditional security concern are now integral components of foreign policy, e.g. terrorism, economic and environmental issues, and human rights. Recommended prerequisite: POLI 223 and/or POLI 225.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-America in the World, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 355 - NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY
The capabilities that together serve as the foundation for a nation's security are always relative to the capabilities of other nations. An understanding of the elements of national security begins with an examination of the international context within which national security must be shaped. This setting determines the security problems and prospects that face any nation and also limits the choices available. The internal structure of a nation must also be considered. The class will provide a foundation for students entering the unfamiliar terrain of questions about why, how, when, and where the U.S. should use its power to protect its values and interests. This includes, but is not limited to, the use of force or the threat to use force. The institutions, procedures, actors and elements that shape the formulation and implementation of security policy will be analyzed and evaluated.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective

POLI 357 - INTERNATIONAL LAW
This course provides an overview of the historical evolution, contemporary problems, issues, and future trends in international law. The relevance of international law to national foreign policies and international organizations will be emphasized along with attention to specific issue areas such as human rights, war and peace, international trade, and terrorism. Substantial research projects will be completed by students who should have a strong background of course work in Political Science, Law and Society, or other relevant programs.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

POLI 360 - CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Conflict and the resolution of conflict is a central concern of our time, in international and domestic politics as well as in other realms of human experience. This course focuses on the patterns of conflict and methods of conflict resolution in international and domestic politics. The concluding section deals with the application of these theories to family, work, and education.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer Thought & Value, MJ-AMER-Advanced Cat Elective, GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective, SS-Sch Core-Consc & Society

POLI 361 - THE MILITARY, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY
This comparative course studies the tensions and relationship between civilian elites, military elites, and mass society in a variety of political contexts. This examination of the political role of the military will involve theory to conceptualize broadly as well as focus specifically on germane case studies: Russia and the former Soviet context, Israel, China, Latin America, and the United States.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

POLI 366 - U.S. - CHINA RELATIONS
This course examines the past and present relations between the United States and China. The first part introduces important theoretical approaches to the study of U.S-China relations. We then turn to an exploration of its historical development. In the last part of the course, we will analyze today's central issues in U.S.-China relations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES

POLI 390 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. POLI 390 POLITICAL VIOLENCE IN AFRICA. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth analysis of political violence on the African continent. Students will explore the following questions: What makes violence political? What motivates people to use violence? Why do some regions of the world seem more violent-prone than others? The course will cover theories of political violence, as well as several specific cases of political violence in African countries. The cases will examine different types of political violence including genocide, separatist movements, and natural resource wars. POLI 390 OPERATION IRAQUI FREEDOM. The class will examine how and why the United States decided to invade Iraq. The policies, programs, strategies and tactics utilized to realize its goals will also be analyzed. We will evaluate the current situation, and prospects for near term success or failure. POLI 390 RELIGION AND POLITICS. This course will review the history of one of the founding principles of the United States: separation of church and state. We will explore the relationship between religion and politics in the US from the time of the Puritans through the rise of the Christian Right. POLI 390 TERRORISM AND COUNTER-TERRORISM. This course will critically examine the causes and characteristics of terrorism today as well as counter-terrorist strategies. Themes to be explored will include: terrorists and weapons of mass destruction, religion and terrorism, the media and terrorism, domestic terrorists in the US, and future terrorists scenarios. Each student will do a case study of a specific terrorist group. POLI 390 POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS. This course will examine the organization, strategy and outcomes of political campaigns on the national, state and local level. Practical as well as theoretical and historical aspects of campaigns will be emphasized. Guest speakers will include campaign managers as well as former and current political officials. POLI 390 CIVIC ACTION. Grassroots democracy as practiced by civic groups; this course will focus on how voluntary associations of citizens address issues at the community to international levels, with emphasis on developing research, communication, organizing, and advocacy skills. POLI 390 CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS. This course focuses upon the dynamics, processes, and actors involved with democratic elections, particularly in US Presidential elections. The first half deals largely with individual voters (psychology, partisanship, turnout, etc.) while the second concentrates on campaigns, candidates, interest groups, fund raising and spending, and the media. POLI 390 THE POLITICS OF IMPEACHMENT. To what extent is the impeachment trial of William Jefferson Clinton a reflection of long-standing historical forces which have been characterized as the "puritan legacy" and to what extent does it reflect unique modern currents of American politics? What are the political, moral and institutional/constitutional challenges raised by this crisis? This course will focus on these questions and utilize both historical and social scientific texts to analyze these issues. POLI 390 SELF AND OTHERS. Through readings and discussion we will explore the complexity of individual and group identity in order to better understand group relationships in American society. We will also evaluate the role identity should play in politics and possible resolutions of inter-group conflict. POLI 390 POLITICAL BEHAVIOR. This course investigates the actions and attitudes of individuals within the American political system: How potential voters act and think, and why. Part one focuses on the political stimuli facing citizens, including topics such as political psychology, decision-making, political attitudes, partisanship and ideology. The second part shifts to the sources of political stimuli (media, issues, campaigns, and social setting) resulting in electoral turnout, campaign contributions, vote choices, etc. This course has relevance to the study of democracies in general.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 5.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 5.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study, Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 401 - POLITICAL INTERNSHIP
A program offering political internships on a flexible, part-time basis for a semester. Students will be placed in education/work experience settings that include, but are not limited to, legislative offices, public interest organizations, political campaign offices, international corporations, foundations, and agencies. The internships will be evaluated by the instructor, students, and the person or agency to which the students are assigned.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 405 - POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR
This course is designed for and required of all graduating Seniors in Political Science. The purpose of the seminar is to provide a format for assessing and evaluating the study of politics. The seminar will be structured around the different specialties in political science -- American Government, International Relations, Comparative Politics, and Political Theory -- and students will be involved in projects and group activities in these areas. This course is designed as a capstone experience for Political Science majors, i.e., to help students understand and assess what it means to be a student/observer of political life and how this affects their lives in general. POLI 405 Political Science Seminar: Revolutionary Change Revolutionary changes--both violent and nonviolent-have altered social institutions, nation states and the world as a whole. This seminar will revolve around the study of the causes and uniformities of revolutions that result in political changes from the local to the international. Leadership, followers, values and ideology, external support, tactics and strategies, and outcomes will be the common framework for a student-selected and organized research project around a revolution. Basic readings, research paper and seminar discussions. This Revolutionary Change Seminar fulfills the Writing Intensive Requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Seminar

Political Science Department

POLI 490 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department

POLI 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Political Science Department


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