Go to Main Content
 

HELP | EXIT

Catalog Entries

 

Spring 2011
Apr 17,2014
Transparent Image
Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course.

LAWS 100 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: LAW AND SOCIETY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Law and Society Department

LAWS 121 - INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND JUSTICE
This course explores the dialectical relation between law and justice from the perspectives of the humanities--drawing substantially from the field of general jurisprudence, and specifically from the disciplines of philosophy, history and literature of law. The focus of the course regards the many ways that justice as both a moral and a legal construct has been conceived in its social and historical contexts from Biblical and Hellenic to modern and contemporary times. Specific emphasis is given to the schism between descriptive and prescriptive theories of justice, the emanation of justice through law in time, and the often problematic relationship of the individual to the state. This course is the first of two required 100 level courses for the Law and Society major, one of which is required as a prerequisite for all other Law and Society courses.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 131 - INTRODUCTION TO LAW AND SOCIETY
This course serves as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of law and society--drawing on the disciplines of anthropology, history, sociology and political science. In this course students will explore the degree to which law permeates every aspect of everyday life, and how such legal saturation in turn influences our lives, shapes our principles and molds our institutions of social justice. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the U.S. legal system, and of the social, cultural, political and economic institutions that frame it--both locally and globally. This course is the second of two required 100 level courses for the Law and Society major, one which is required as a prerequisite for all other Law and Society courses.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

LAWS 198 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 199 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 200 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: LAW AND SOCIETY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Law and Society Department

LAWS 201 - COMPARATIVE LEGAL SYSTEMS
This course examines the comparative study of the great diversity of legal systems that span the globe today, and the socio-political contexts in which they occur. It will explore common law, civil law, socialist, traditional, and various hybrid forms of legal systems by focusing on a sampling of these disparate legal types -- specifically, the Anglo-American, the Romano-Germanic, the Soviet-Chinese, and the Indo-African families of law. Non-LAWS majors should see instructor for waiver of prerequisite.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc

LAWS 202 - FAMOUS TRIALS
This course will highlight several famous trials that have stirred the American consciousness. Although it will focus on actual criminal trials that have arisen in the United States, fictional, civil and international cases will be cross-referenced when appropriate. By examining the particular details of each case within its socio-historical context, we will attempt to uncover the universal aspects that make a trial famous, and in so doing disclose the various ways in which a case is reflective of the society in which it emerges.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 203 - AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
This course entails an analysis of the history, functions, components, and evolution of the criminal justice system in America. Traditional and contemporary concepts of criminal justice within open and closed social systems as a mechanism for social control will be contrasted. Understanding human behavior, the process of socialization, conformity, and deviance will also be discussed.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 204 - PRACTICUM IN COMMUNITY POLICING

0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 205 - COMMUNITY POLICING INSTITUTE
The Community Policing Institute is designed to train officers, educate citizens, and promote community-oriented government. The ten-module course covers such topics as cultural diversity in community policing, conflict resolution, strategic planning, and ethical issues in policing. This course will be taught off-campus at the Bergen County Police and Fire Academy.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 206 - COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES OF HUMAN RIGHTS
This course explores the cross-cultural dimensions of international human rights. African, Asian, and Latin-American cultural perspectives are particularly examined in relation to the universality of rights.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Global Issues Conc, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 207 - COMMUNITY POLICE CAPSTONE
Upon completion of the 10-module Community Policing Institute, students may register for this one-credit capstone project to complete the Community Policing Sequence. The project will focus on addressing a community-based problem or concern using the skills attained during the Institute.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 212 - ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
A detailed analysis of the various aspects of criminal justice. Students will research and report on law making; the police; the courts and their ancillary programs, such as probation and the spectrum of corrections; and focus on how decisions are made by victims, police, prosecutors, defense lawyers, parole officers, and other actors in the system. The course will explore plea bargaining, court appointed counsel, the sentencing procedure, and the ideal of equality before the law.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 213 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN POLICING
This course explores the history and scope of the relationship between the police and the community. Community relationships are examined from psychological and sociological perspectives. The course analyzes police issues such as media relations; citizen grievances; civilian review boards; selection, training, and education of personnel; police professionalism; discretionary use of police authority; police unionism; crime prevention; and the role of women in police agencies. (Bergen Community College ITV course)
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 214 - DISABILITY LAW & SOCIETY
This course seeks to help students place current ideas of disability within their broadest possible legal and social context. This course seeks to engage students in the historical and contemporary definitions of disability, the relationship between law and the disability community. The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of disabled populations and law that deinstitutionalizes legal responses to difference and creates in the student an imagination for innovative resolutions regarding contemporary issues affecting disabled populations, their family, caregivers and the society in which they live and work.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 215 - MOOT COURT
This course is dedicated to learning about the court process from an attorney's point of view. It will expose students to the stages of pretrial, trial and appellate proceedings, and the requirements of presenting arguments and evidence in court. This is an experiential course, in which students learn by doing. This course will build on the skills of public speaking, persuasive communication and critical thinking. It includes mock trials and appeals before judges and jurors.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 224 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
This course will explore American constitutional law by examining: (1) the moral and ideological foundations of the Constitution; (2) the socio-historical context in which it emerged and developed; (3) the profiles of the most prominent Supreme Court justices; and most importantly, (4) the landmark cases which form the basis of our constitutional system. It presupposes a basic knowledge of American history and some familiarity with legal terminology and concepts.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER-Amer Politics & Soc., GE TOPICS SOCIAL SCIENCE, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 228 - CRIMINAL LAW
A survey of the American legal system in relation to the apprehension, conviction, and ultimate treatment of the criminal. Specific analysis will focus on the meaning of crime as well as the constitutional principles which are related to this field of law.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 233 - AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY
This course will explore the central themes, debates and ideologies that have molded (and continue to mold) the American legal system by critically examining the fundamental legal documents and the pivotal cases which constitute the legal history of the United States. This legal history is not merely a mass of empty facts and judgments abstracted from a past which has long since passed away, but is rather the essential, vital source of our living present--an enduring past that is constantly being projected into the future in the everyday trials, the legislative debates and the administration of justice which compose so much of our modern world.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-AMER- Amer History

LAWS 251 - CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND THE LAW
This course allows students to delve more deeply into a contemporary issue or issues in Law and Society. The course is focused on an organizing theme or themes that vary across semesters and among instructors. By focusing on one or more themes, this course helps students to understand how issues emerge and are handled by the legal system. This course challenges students to use their background in law and justice and their understanding of law and society to explore issues of contemporary importance to their lives.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
On Line Course

LAWS 298 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 299 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 300 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: LAW AND SOCIETY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Law and Society Department

LAWS 310 - LAW AND THE ELDERLY
This course is intended for students in social work, psychology, law and society, gerontology, and other human service professions. The elderly are increasing three-times as fast as other groups in our society. Programs and residences for seniors are appearing everywhere. Practitioners need to know how to protect the elderly and assist the family in long-term planning. We will consider the recently changed legal climate for the elderly. Topics include: wills, guardianships, powers of attorney, living trusts, Medicare, and social security regulations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 321 - FIELD STUDIES: LAW AND SOCIETY
This course is the first of three courses comprising the capstone of the Law and Society Program that generally seek to foster propensities toward experiential and life-long learning. It is only open to Law and Society majors--specifically juniors and seniors who intend to graduate in four semesters or less. This course encourages students to combine theory and practice in a law-related field placement, such as a legislative or executive office, a criminal justice setting or a legal advocacy group. Students should contact the instructor for a permit to enroll in the course. Students will keep a daily journal of their experiential learning, and upon completion of the internship will prepare a critical field report reflecting upon their experience through the lenses of Law and Society.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

LAWS 324 - FAMILY LAW
An in-depth study of the legal concepts and institutions which apply to many aspects of the American family. Marriage, paternity, divorce, child custody, and other related issues will be included in this survey.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 325 - SOCIAL REALITY OF CRIMINAL LAW
This will be an exciting opportunity not only to study criminal law, but also to leave the classroom frequently and visit police training programs, correctional institutions, go to court and see the delivery of services. We will tailor the off-campus excursions to our needs and interests.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 326 - CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELDWORK
Criminal Justice Fieldwork incorporates limited classroom work with non-salaried off-campus work experience with various components of the criminal justice system. The objective of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to observe the functions of the police, courts and corrections components of the criminal justice system and experience their work environments.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 332 - PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LAW
This course explores the complex relationship between psychology and the law, focusing on the historical development of this interdisciplinary field, the role of mental health professionals in the interrogation process, and the role of psychology and psychiatry in the trial process. Topics to be examined include coercion in the interrogation process, criminal profiling, the assessment of competence and sanity, as well as the role of psychologists and psychiatrists in shaping jury selection, influencing judges, presenting evidence and assessing risk and predicting future behavior in sentencing decisions.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 334 - JUVENILE JUSTICE
An exploration of various forms of delinquency in America. The course will examine official and informal reactions to delinquency, discuss relevant explanations for this delinquency, and analyze the juvenile justice system.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 337 - CRIMINAL COURT PROCESS
This course examines the prosecution to adjudication process in the American criminal court system. We will examine the "middle stages" of the criminal justice system, the prosecution's decision to charge, pre-trial procedures, and the criminal trial and sentencing phase. Specifically, the roles of the prosecution, defense and judiciary will be discussed from an historical, legal, and social science perspective. Finally, this course will highlight developments and changes in the court process and the legal rights of the accused. The course is highly recommended for those students who have already taken MLWS 228. Recommended prerequisite: MLWS 228.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 340 - CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE
This course is a sustained inquiry into the phenomenon of modern civil disobedience, primarily by way of the thinking and practice of its greatest proponents. It will proceed in two distinct stages. First, it will uncover the pivotal foundations of modern civil disobedience by exploring the lives and times of its founding fathers--Socrates, Thoreau and Tolstoy. We will then turn from foundations to contemporary practice to examine the lives and times of its two greatest practitioners (Gandhi and King), and to critically highlight some of the most salient historical examples of the practice.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
GE-TOPICS ARTS AND HUMANITIES, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 341 - WOMEN AND THE LAW
This course will examine the history of women's subordinate position in the law, and the role of sex/gender as an axis of oppression and social differences. Topics include feminist movements, feminist legal theories, and intersectionality of oppression.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 343 - PROBATION AND PAROLE
The objective of this course is to introduce the students to the different components of community corrections and establish the criteria and guidelines under which probation and parole officers operate. As an alternative to traditional incarceration, probation and parole serves a three-fold ideology of rehabilitation, reduction in the prison population, and protection of the community. These three themes will be examined in detail on both the state and federal levels. In addition, other correctional alternatives such as intensive supervision programs and boot camps will be addressed during the semester.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 345 - ANCIENT FAMILY LAW
This course will examine the religious dimensions of law and the legal dimensions of religion through the comparative examination of underlying principles behind Biblical, Mesopotamian, and Greek family law. Attention will be given to judicial procedures with concentration placed on the legal role of women in society, including marriage, adoption, and succession. The Biblical view that law and religion are inseparable will also be contrasted with secular approaches to family law as found in Mesopotamian and Classical "codes" as well as with the growing Moslem theocratic belief that traditional Islamic family law is compatible with the needs of a modern society.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
GE-INTERNATIONAL ISSUES, MJ-INTL-Intl Compare- Non-West, MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 346 - VICTIMS AND THE LAW
This course will introduce you to issues relevant to victims in the crime and criminal justice context. The history, theory and collection of victimization data that will be discussed. However, the collection of factual knowledge is less important than the development of critical thinking and abstract reasoning. It is expected that you will identify the strength and weakness in the information provided to you in the text, journal articles, and statistics. Also, you must be able to articulate opinions on a variety of issues and support your position. The ability to conceptualize ideas and apply information to an assortment of scenarios is required. Each student will be required to participate in steps to create a program dedicated to the protection of child victims in the court system. This will result in a final paper in the course. Recommended prerequisite: MLWS 203.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 351 - CONSTITUTIONAL LIBERTIES
Constitutional Liberties explores the values and principles our society adopted by establishing the U.S. Constitution. The course will trace the evolution of those values by examining court cases where rights and liberties, such as freedom of speech, religion, privacy, rights of the accused, and the equality of minorities emerged. The case law approach allows the student to critically examine the process of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. The course will emphasize the evolution of constitutional liberties within the political, racial, social and economic context of U.S. history.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 353 - LEGAL RHETORIC
This course seeks to help students to understand the relationship between classical rhetoric, legal reasoning and interpretation. It introduces students to legal semiotics--the study of certain categories of argument that recur throughout the law. This course also seeks to help students to see a legal argument as a "roadmap" that guides jury, jurist and lawyer to certain "destinations" or conclusions. The goal of this course is to provide students with the tools that they will need to assess the sufficiency of quantitative and qualitative legal arguments, and to enable students to formulate arguments of their own--two foundational skills for the development of their Law and Society theses.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

LAWS 390 - TOPICS:
The descriptions and topics of this course change from semester-to-semester, as well as from instructor-to-instructor. Prerequisite: varies with the topic offered. LAWS 39001 FORENSICS. Multidisciplinary and reality based approach introduces students to "Forensic Investigation" to demonstrate how Anthropology, Botany, and Entomology provide critical data in resolving investigational goals. The coursework covers origin, history and the role of science in bringing criminals to justice. Student's work in the field and classroom environment locate, identify, collect and transport physical evidence that may be used at trial for determining causation and linking the accused to a crime. LAWS 39002 CRIME, CRIMINALS AND BILL OF RIGHTS. This course shall analyze selected landmark criminal cases addressing issues arising out of the prosecution of various criminal offenses, such as: homicide; sexual crimes; terrorism; arson; kidnapping; weapons offenses; controlled dangerous substances; RICO; organized crime; fraud; white collar crimes; etc. The case method approach, as utilized in law schools, shall be followed in the study of these decisions which involve analysis of Bill of Rights guarantees such as: probable cause; due process; search and seizure; confessions; cruel and unusual punishment; right to keep and bear arms; right to counsel; competency; speedy trial; confrontation of witnesses; double jeopardy; etc. LAWS 39003 PROOF, SCIENCE & COURTS. This topics seminar will address the principal themes of (1) certainty and proof in science and the law, including the historical development of epistemological criteria applied in science and the courts; (2) forensic science and the law, particularly the concepts of "scientific reliability" and the admissibility of scientific evidence; (3) advances in biomedical science and the law, including their impact on traditional ideas of family and kinship; and (4) intellectual property in the digital culture, and other issues as they may arise in class discussions. LAWS 390 DEATH PENALTY: The course will look at the history of the death penalty in the United States and examine empirical data. Heavy emphasis will be given to Supreme Court decisions concerning the death penalty as well as political arguments about capital punishment. We will view the death penalty from the vantage point of citizens, judges, lawyers, juries, and the accused. State and federal death penalty issues will be discussed from a legal and political perspective. LAWS 390 LAW & SEXUALITY. The course examines the law attempting to regulate human sexuality. It looks at the theories behind sexual morality laws, the methods used, the effectiveness of such regulation and its effects on us as sexual beings. Topics covered include marriage, laws covering sexual conduct, sexual orientation and gender identity.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture, Online Course

Law and Society Department

Course Attributes:
MJ-LAWS-Law & Society Elective

LAWS 398 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 399 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY: LAW AND SOCIETY
Limited opportunities to enroll for course work on an Independent Study basis are available. A student interested in this option should obtain an Independent Study Registration Form from the Registrar, have it completed by the instructor and school dean involved, and return it to the Registrar's Office. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for policies concerning Independent Study.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Independent Study

Law and Society Department

LAWS 411 - LAW AND THE LITERARY IMAGINATION
This course examines the field of law and literature. We will use available bibliographic resources and selected texts to examine the issues and approaches dominant in critical discussions among scholars and jurists. We will examine such traditional concerns of law and literature as the influence of law on literature through the figure of the lawyer, the theme of justice and the metaphor of the trial. Other emergent areas of inquiry to be explored include such concerns as the function of interpretation in law and literature, the literary analysis of legal texts, and first amendment issues in author-subject relations.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 421 - DIRECTED READINGS: LAW AND SOCIETY
This course is one of three courses comprising the capstone of the Law and Society Program that generally seek to foster propensities toward experiential and life-long learning. It is only open to Law and Society majors--specifically juniors and seniors who intend to graduate in three semesters or less. Directed Readings is designed to prepare the way for the composition of a Law and Society Thesis--the culmination of a student's Law and Society training. This course focuses on the construction of a thesis topic, the composition of a thesis statement and the completion of the necessary research to ground the writing of a thesis. Upon completion of this course students should be ready to engage in the composition of their Law and Society thesis. Students should contact the instructor for a permit to enroll in the course.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 431 - THESIS SUPERVISION: LAW AND SOCIETY
This course is one of the three courses comprising the capstone of the Law and Society Program that generally seek to foster propensities toward experiential and life-long learning. It is the culmination of one's study in Law and Society. It is only open to Law and Society majors--specifically juniors and seniors who intend to graduate in three semesters or less. In this course students will write their Law and Society theses that will incorporate the perspectives and methodologies that they have studied throughout the program. This thesis is a major undertaking (of at least 40 pages in length) that critically examines an issue that has been chosen by the student with the help of her mentor. The thesis will become the final piece of a student's portfolio in Law and Society.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 498 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation describes a transfer course from another institution where an equivalency to a Ramapo College course has not been determined. Upon convener evaluation, this course ID may be changed to an equivalent of a Ramapo College course or may fulfill a requirement.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department

LAWS 499 - TRANSFER ELECTIVE
This course designation is used to describe a transfer course from another institution which has been evaluated by the convener. A course with this course number has no equivalent Ramapo course. It may fulfill a requirement or may count as a free elective.
0.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Lecture

Law and Society Department


Return to Previous New Search XML Extract
Transparent Image
Skip to top of page
Release: 8.5.4